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Sleep. 2004 Sep 15;27(6):1163-9.

Who reports insomnia? Relationships with age, sex, ethnicity, and socioeconomic deprivation.

Author information

1
Sleep/Wake Research Centre, Research School of Public Health, Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand. s.j.paine@massey.ac.nz

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

To investigate the prevalence of self-reported insomnia symptoms among Mâori (indigenous people) and non-Mâori adults in the general population of New Zealand. To explore the possible links between insomnia symptoms and ethnicity, gender, age, employment status and socio-economic deprivation.

DESIGN:

Mail-out survey to a stratified random sample of 4,000 people aged 20 to 59 years, selected from the electoral roll.

SETTING:

Nationwide survey of New Zealand adults (72.5% response rate).

PARTICIPANTS:

The sample design aimed for equal numbers of Mâori and non-Mâori participants, men and women, and participants in each decade of age.

INTERVENTIONS:

N/A.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS:

Population prevalence estimates indicated that self-reported insomnia symptoms and sleeping problems were higher among Mâori than non-Mâori. Multiple logistic regression analyses identified unemployment and socioeconomic deprivation as being strongly associated to all insomnia symptoms and to reporting a sleeping problem lasting more than 6 months.

CONCLUSIONS:

Socioeconomic factors and ethnicity are significant independent predictors of reported insomnia symptoms. This finding has important implications for the provision of treatment services to those most in need.

PMID:
15532211
DOI:
10.1093/sleep/27.6.1163
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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