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Am J Ophthalmol. 2004 Nov;138(5):788-98.

Four Japanese male patients with juvenile retinoschisis: only three have mutations in the RS1 gene.

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1
Department of Ophthalmology, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. taka@jikei.ac.jp

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To describe the clinical phenotypes of four unrelated Japanese male patients with juvenile retinoschisis and to investigate occurrences of mutations in the RS1 gene.

DESIGN:

Observational case series and experimental study.

METHODS:

Fundus examinations, fluorescein angiography, and single-flash electroretinography (ERG) were carried out. In one patient, optical coherence tomography (OCT) was performed. The coding regions of the RS1 gene that encodes retinoschisin were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR products were purified and directly sequenced.

RESULTS:

The four affected patients showed cystoid- or wheel-like foveal changes with a little or no fluorescein leakage and negative b-wave patterns in both eyes. The OCT images of foveal retinoschisis disclosed that splitting occurs in the putative fibers of Henle. In three patients, we identified three different missense mutations (p.S73P, p.Y89C, p.R209C) in the functionally important discoidin domain of the RS1 gene. The p.S73P mutation has not been previously reported. In contrast, no nucleotide substitutions were detected in the fourth patient whose parents were unrelated and asymptomatic. No other member of this family for three generations has had juvenile retinoschisis.

CONCLUSION:

Because serine 73 is conserved in the mouse ortholog and other discoidin proteins, the proline 73 allele is therefore very likely to encode a defective retinoschisin. Although the inheritance pattern is uncertain in the patient without the RS1 mutation, the clinical and ERG findings were indistinguishable from those of patients with RS1 mutations. This finding points to the genetic heterogeneity of juvenile retinoschisis.

PMID:
15531314
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajo.2004.06.031
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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