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Vaccine. 2004 Dec 2;23(3):372-9.

Beliefs and behaviours: understanding chiropractors and immunization.

Author information

  • 1Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Dr NW, Calgary, Alta., Canada T2N 4N1. mlrussel@ucalgary.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Concerns have been raised about the beliefs and behaviours of chiropractors related to immunization; however, none have systematically examined the relationships between beliefs and behaviours.

PURPOSE:

We examine the immunization-related behaviours and beliefs of chiropractors in Alberta, Canada, and explore the relationship of beliefs to immunization-related behaviours with patients.

METHODS:

Data were collected in 2002 from a postal survey of Alberta chiropractors. The questionnaire inquired about six behaviours of interest in the six months prior to survey (gave information about risks/benefits of vaccination; advised patients in favour/against have self/children immunized; counselled on freedom of choice; directed to sources of information on immunization). It included items addressing beliefs and norms related to immunization.

RESULTS:

The response rate was 78.2% (503/643). Immunization arose with patients at least monthly for 36.5% of respondents, and at least weekly for 9.2%. One quarter advised patients in favour and 27% against having themselves/their children immunized. A parsimonious model of chiropractor pro/anti-vaccination behaviours included beliefs about the efficacy/safety of vaccination, chiropractic philosophy and individual rights.

CONCLUSIONS:

Similar proportions of chiropractors advise patients in favour or against immunization. A small minority deals with immunization issues frequently. Behaviours can be understood in the context of beliefs.

PMID:
15530683
DOI:
10.1016/j.vaccine.2004.05.027
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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