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Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2004 Oct;25(10):842-6.

Rapidly rising prevalence of nosocomial multidrug-resistant, Gram-negative bacilli: a 9-year surveillance study.

Author information

1
Division of Infectious Diseases, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine and quantify the temporal trends of nosocomial multidrug-resistant, gram-negative bacilli.

DESIGN:

A 9-year surveillance study was conducted. Multidrug resistance was defined as resistance to 3 or more antimicrobial classes.

SETTING:

Tertiary-care institution.

RESULTS:

From 1994 to 2002, multidrug-resistant, gram-negative bacilli increased from 1% to 16% for multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 4% to 13% for multidrug-resistant Enterobacter species, 0.5% to 17% for multidrug-resistant Klebsiella species, 0% to 9% for multidrug-resistant Proteus species, and 0.2% to 4% for multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli (P < or = .05). The most common pattern of multidrug resistance was co-resistance to quinolones, third-generation cephalosporins, and aminoglycosides.

CONCLUSION:

The rapid rise of multidrug-resistant, gram-negative bacilli may warrant infection control programs to include these pathogens in strategies aimed at limiting the emergence and spread of antimicrobial-resistant pathogens.

PMID:
15518026
DOI:
10.1086/502306
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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