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Am J Public Health. 2004 Nov;94(11):1959-64.

Effects of restaurant and bar smoking regulations on exposure to environmental tobacco smoke among Massachusetts adults.

Author information

1
Social and Behavioral Sciences Department, Boston University School of Public Health, 715 Albany St, TW2, Boston, MA 02118, USA. aalbers@bu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We examined the association of local restaurant and bar regulations with self-reported exposure to environmental tobacco smoke among adults.

METHODS:

Data were derived from a telephone survey involving a random sample of Massachusetts households.

RESULTS:

Compared with adults from towns with no restaurant smoking restrictions, those from towns with strong regulations had more than twice the odds of reporting nonexposure to environmental tobacco smoke (odds ratio [OR]=2.74; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.97, 3.80), and those from towns with some restrictions had 1.62 times the odds of reporting nonexposure (OR=1.62; 95% CI=1.29, 2.02). Bar smoking bans had even greater effects on exposure.

CONCLUSIONS:

Strong local clean indoor air regulations were associated with lower levels of reported exposure to environmental tobacco smoke in restaurants and bars.

PMID:
15514237
PMCID:
PMC1448569
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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