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Plast Reconstr Surg. 2004 Nov;114(6):1373-81.

Primary correction of unilateral cleft lip nasal deformity in Asian patients: anthropometric evaluation.

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1
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, School of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan, Korea. sgkim1@daunet.donga.ac.kr

Abstract

Previously it was thought that primary correction of nasal deformity in cleft lip patients would cause developmental impairment of the nose. It is now widely accepted that simultaneous correction of the cleft lip nasal deformity has no adverse effect on nasal growth. Thus, the authors tried to evaluate the results of primary correction of cleft lip in Asian patients. Of 412 cases of cleft lip, 195 cases were corrected by means of the conventional method from June of 1992 to June of 1997, and 217 cases were corrected by simultaneous rhinoplasty from July of 1997 to October of 2001. The average patient age was 3 months. Photographs and anthropometric evaluation were used to evaluate the results. Nasal tip projection, columellar length, and nasal width were measured in 60 randomized normal children, 30 randomized children treated with the conventional method, and 30 randomized children with primary nasal repair. Data were analyzed using t tests, and the level of significance was 5 percent (p < 0.05). In cases of simultaneous repair, nasal tip projection and columellar length were increased 24.8 percent and 28.8 percent, respectively. Nasal width was increased 12.3 percent in the cases of simultaneous repair and 12.6 percent in the cases without primary rhinoplasty. Simultaneous repair of cleft lip and nasal deformity in Asian patients showed that more symmetry of nostril and nasal dome projection and better correction of buckling and alar flaring were achieved. More balanced growth and development of the alar complex was achieved, and no interference with nasal growth was encountered.

PMID:
15509922
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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