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Am J Pathol. 2004 Nov;165(5):1519-33.

T-cell properties determine disease site, clinical presentation, and cellular pathology of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, New Research Building, 77 Louis Pasteur Ave., Boston, MA 02115, USA. sara@abromson-leeman@hms.harvard.edu

Abstract

Two distinct clinical phenotypes of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis are observed in BALB interferon-gamma knockout mice immunized with encephalitogenic peptides of myelin basic protein. Conventional disease, characterized by ascending weakness and paralysis, occurs with greater frequency after immunizing with a peptide comprising residues 59 to 76. Axial-rotatory disease, characterized by uncontrolled axial rotation, occurs with greater frequency in mice immunized with a peptide corresponding to exon 2 of the full length 21.5-kd protein. The two clinical phenotypes are histologically distinguishable. Conventional disease is characterized by inflammation and demyelination primarily in spinal cord, whereas axial-rotatory disease involves inflammation and demyelination of lateral medullary areas of brain. Both types have infiltrates in which neutrophils are a predominating component. By isolating T cells and transferring disease to naive recipients, we show here that the type of disease is determined entirely by the inducing T cell. Furthermore, studies using CXCR2 knockout recipients, unable to recruit neutrophils to inflammatory sites, show that although neutrophils are critical for some of these T cells to effect disease, there are also interferon-gamma-deficient T cells that induce disease in the absence of both interferon-gamma and neutrophils. These results highlight the multiplicity of T-cell-initiated effector pathways available for inflammation and demyelination.

PMID:
15509523
PMCID:
PMC1618652
DOI:
10.1016/S0002-9440(10)63410-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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