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Arch Microbiol. 1992;157(2):148-54.

Anaerobic degradation of trans-cinnamate and omega-phenylalkane carboxylic acids by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris: evidence for a beta-oxidation mechanism.

Author information

1
Robert Hill Institute, Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, UK.

Abstract

The mechanism responsible for the initial steps in the anaerobic degradation of trans-cinnamate and omega-phenylalkane carboxylates by the purple non-sulphur photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris was investigated. Phenylacetate did not support growth and there was a marked CO2 dependence for growth on acids with greater side-chain lengths. Here, CO2 was presumably acting as a redox sink for the disposal of excess reducing equivalents. Growth on benzoate did not require the addition of exogenous CO2. Aromatic acids with an odd number of side-chain carbon atoms (3-phenylpropionate, 5-phenylvalerate, 7-phenylheptanoate) gave greater apparent molar growth yields than those with an even number of side-chain carbon atoms (4-phenylbutyrate, 6-phenylhexanoate, 8-phenyloctanoate). HPLC analysis revealed that phenylacetate accumulated and persisted in the culture medium during growth on these latter compounds. Cinnamate and benzoate transiently accumulated in the culture medium during growth on 3-phenylpropionate, and benzoate alone accumulated transiently during the course of trans-cinnamate degradation. The transient accumulation of 4-phenyl-2-butenoic acid occurred during growth on 4-phenylbutyrate, and phenylacetate accumulated to a 1:1 molar stoichiometry with the initial 4-phenylbutyrate concentration. It is proposed that the initial steps in the anaerobic degradation of trans-cinnamate and the group of acids from 3-phenylpropionate to 8-phenyloctanoate involves beta-oxidation of the side-chain.

PMID:
1550442
DOI:
10.1007/bf00245283
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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