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Immunology. 2004 Nov;113(3):348-54.

Interleukin-10 secreted by B-1 cells modulates the phagocytic activity of murine macrophages in vitro.

Author information

1
Discipline of Immunology, Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Brazil.

Abstract

As demonstrated previously in our laboratory, B-1 cells migrate from the peritoneal cavity of mice and home to a distant site of inflammation to become macrophage-like cells. However, the influence that these cells might have on the kinetics and fate of the inflammatory process is not known. Considering that macrophages are pivotal in the inflammatory reaction, we decided to investigate the possible influence B-1 cells could have on macrophage activities in vitro. Our results show that peritoneal macrophages from Xid mice, a mouse strain deprived of B-1 cells, have higher phagocytic indexes for zymozan particles when compared with macrophages from wild-type mice. Moreover, macrophages from wild-type mice have a lower ability to release nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide when compared with macrophages from Xid mice. Experiments using cocultures of B-1 cells and macrophages from Xid mice in transwell plates demonstrated that B-1 cells down-regulate macrophage activities. These observations also indicate that this phenomenon is not due to a physical interaction between these two cell populations. As B-1 cells are one of the main sources of interleukin (IL)-10, we demonstrate in this study that adherent peritoneal cells from Xid mice produce significantly less amounts of this cytokine in culture when compared with IL-10 production by cells from wild-type mice. When B-1 cells from IL-10 knock-out mice and macrophages from wild-type mice were cocultured in transwell plates, the phagocytic index of macrophages was not altered demonstrating that B-1 cells can influence the effector functions of macrophages in vitro via IL-10 secretion.

PMID:
15500621
PMCID:
PMC1782584
DOI:
10.1111/j.1365-2567.2004.01969.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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