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Am J Cardiol. 1992 Apr 1;69(9):891-8.

Correlations among time and frequency domain measures of heart period variability two weeks after acute myocardial infarction.

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1
Department of Medicine, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032.

Abstract

Seven hundred fifteen participants from a multicenter natural history study of acute myocardial infarction were studied (1) to determine the correlations among time and frequency domain measures of heart period variability, (2) to determine the correlations between the measures of heart period variability and previously established post-infarction risk predictors, and (3) to determine the predictive value of time domain measures of heart period variability for death during follow-up after acute myocardial infarction. Twenty-four hour electrocardiographic recordings obtained 11 +/- 3 days after acute myocardial infarction were analyzed and 11 measures of heart period variability were computed. Each of 4 bands in the heart period power spectrum had 1 or 2 corresponding variables in the time domain that correlated with it so strongly (r greater than or equal to 0.90) that the variables were essentially equivalent: ultra low frequency power with SDNN* and SDANN index,* very low frequency power and low-frequency power with SDNN index,* and high-frequency power with r-MSSD* and pNN50.* As expected from theoretical considerations, SDNN and the square root of total power were almost perfectly correlated. Correlations between the time and frequency domain measures of heart period variability and previously identified postinfarction risk predictors, e.g., left ventricular ejection fraction and ventricular arrhythmias, are remarkably weak. Time domain measures of heart period variability, especially those that measure ultra low or low-frequency power, are strongly and independently associated with death during follow-up. * Defined in Table II.

PMID:
1550018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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