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Aviat Space Environ Med. 2004 Oct;75(10):881-8.

Antioxidant supplementation does not attenuate oxidative stress at high altitude.

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1
VA Palo Alto Health Care System, 3801 Miranda Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94304-1290, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Hypobaric hypoxia and heightened metabolic rate increase free radical production.

PURPOSE:

We tested the hypothesis that antioxidant supplementation would reduce oxidative stress associated with increased energy expenditure (negative energy balance) at high altitude (HA 4300 m).

METHODS:

For 12 d at sea level (SL), 18 active men were fed a weight-stabilizing diet. Testing included fasting blood and 24-h urine samples to assess antioxidant status [plasma alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene, lipid hydroperoxides (LPO), and urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG)] and a prolonged submaximal (55% Vo2peak) oxidative stress index test (OSI) to evaluate exercise-induced oxidative stress (plasma LPO, whole blood reduced and oxidized glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, and urinary 8-OHdG). Subjects were then matched and randomly assigned to either a placebo or antioxidant supplement group for a double-blinded trial. Supplementation (20,000 IU of beta-carotene, 400 IU alpha-tocopherol acetate, 500 mg ascorbic acid, 100 microg selenium, and 30 mg zinc, or placebo) was begun 3 wk prior to and throughout a 14-d HA intervention. At HA, subjects' daily energy intake and expenditure were adjusted to achieve a caloric deficit of approximately 1400 kcal. Fasting blood and 24-h urine samples were collected throughout HA and the OSI test was repeated on HA day 1 and day 13.

RESULTS:

Resting LPO concentrations increased and urinary 8-OHdG concentrations decreased over HA with no effect of supplementation. Prolonged submaximal exercise was not associated with increased concentrations of oxidative stress markers at SL or HA.

CONCLUSIONS:

Antioxidant supplementation did not significantly affect markers of oxidative stress associated with increased energy expenditure at HA.

PMID:
15497369
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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