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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2004 Nov 2;101(44):15748-53. Epub 2004 Oct 20.

CD209L (L-SIGN) is a receptor for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology Program, University Colorado Health Sciences Center, 4200 East 9th Avenue, Denver, CO 80262, USA.

Abstract

Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a receptor for SARS-CoV, the novel coronavirus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome [Li, W. Moore, M. J., Vasilieva, N., Sui, J., Wong, S. K., Berne, M. A., Somasundaran, M., Sullivan, J. L., Luzuriaga, K., Greenough, T. C., et al. (2003) Nature 426, 450-454]. We have identified a different human cellular glycoprotein that can serve as an alternative receptor for SARS-CoV. A human lung cDNA library in vesicular stomatitis virus G pseudotyped retrovirus was transduced into Chinese hamster ovary cells, and the cells were sorted for binding of soluble SARS-CoV spike (S) glycoproteins, S(590) and S(1180). Clones of transduced cells that bound SARS-CoV S glycoprotein were inoculated with SARS-CoV, and increases in subgenomic viral RNA from 1-16 h or more were detected by multiplex RT-PCR in four cloned cell lines. Sequencing of the human lung cDNA inserts showed that each of the cloned cell lines contained cDNA that encoded human CD209L, a C-type lectin (also called L-SIGN). When the cDNA encoding CD209L from clone 2.27 was cloned and transfected into Chinese hamster ovary cells, the cells expressed human CD209L glycoprotein and became susceptible to infection with SARS-CoV. Immunohistochemistry showed that CD209L is expressed in human lung in type II alveolar cells and endothelial cells, both potential targets for SARS-CoV. Several other enveloped viruses including Ebola and Sindbis also use CD209L as a portal of entry, and HIV and hepatitis C virus can bind to CD209L on cell membranes but do not use it to mediate virus entry. Our data suggest that the large S glycoprotein of SARS-CoV may use both ACE2 and CD209L in virus infection and pathogenesis.

PMID:
15496474
PMCID:
PMC524836
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.0403812101
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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