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Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2004 Oct 18;(4):CD001720.

Depot pipotiazine palmitate and undecylenate for schizophrenia.

Author information

1
Leeds Community Mental health Teaching NHS Trust, Department of Liaison Psychiatry, Becklin centre, Alma Street, Leeds, W Yorkshire, UK, LS9 7BE.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Antipsychotic drugs are usually given orally but compliance may be problematic. The development of depot injections in the 1960s gave rise to their extensive use as a means of long-term maintenance treatment. Pipotiazine palmitate is a depot from the phenothiazine family of antipsychotic drugs.

OBJECTIVES:

To assess the clinical, social and economic effects of depot pipotiazine palmitate and undecylenate compared with placebo, oral antipsychotics and other depot antipsychotic preparations for people with schizophrenia.

SEARCH STRATEGY:

For this update we searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Register (June 2003). We also inspected references of all identified trials for more studies and contacted relevant industries.

SELECTION CRITERIA:

We included all randomised clinical trials comparing depot pipotiazine palmitate and undecylenate to oral antipsychotics or other depot preparations for people with schizophrenia.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS:

We reliably selected, quality rated and independently extracted data from relevant studies. We calculated the random effects relative risk (RR), the 95% confidence intervals (CI) and, where possible the number needed to treat (NNT) on an intention-to-treat basis. For continuous data, we calculated weighted mean differences (WMD). We only presented scale data for those tools that had attained pre-specified levels of quality.

MAIN RESULTS:

When pipotiazine palmitate was compared with 'standard' oral antipsychotic no differences were found for outcomes of global impression (n=53, 1 RCT, RR 2.57, CI 0.8 to 8.6), relapse (n=124, 1 RCT, RR 1.55 CI 0.76 to 3.2), study attrition (n=219, 3 RCTs, RR 1.37 CI 0.8 to 2.4) and behaviour (n=124, 1 RCT, WMD 4.65, CI -1.1 to 10.4). There was also no reported difference in adverse effects such as tardive dyskinesia or the need for anticholinergic drugs. Sixteen studies compared pipotiazine palmitate with other depot preparations (n=1123). Pipotiazine palmitate was consistently equivalent to other depots in terms of a range of outcomes, including global impression (n=217, 4 RCTs, RR not improved 0.99 CI 0.91 to 1.07), relapse (n=239, 5 RCTs, RR relapse by 1 year 0.98 CI 0.55 to 1.75), and adverse effects (n=337, 5 RCTs, RR needing anticholinergic medication 0.98 CI 0.84 to 1.15).

REVIEWERS' CONCLUSIONS:

Although well-conducted and reported randomised trials are still needed to fully inform practice (no trial data exists reporting hospital and services outcomes, satisfaction with care and economics) pipotiazine palmitate is a viable choice for both clinician and recipient of care.

Update of

PMID:
15495016
DOI:
10.1002/14651858.CD001720.pub2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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