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Clin Infect Dis. 2004 Oct 15;39(8):1161-9. Epub 2004 Sep 24.

Bloodstream infections: a trial of the impact of different methods of reporting positive blood culture results.

Author information

1
Division of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain. ebouza@microb.net

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The impact of how positive blood culture results are reported on the evolution bloodstream infections (BSIs) has not been assessed.

METHODS:

We randomly assigned patients with BSIs into 3 groups: group A (for which physicians received a conventional report), group B (for which physicians received a conventional report and a written alert on the chart with clinical advice), and group C (for which physicians received the above plus oral clinical advice). The adequacy of therapy before and after receipt of the different types of information was assessed.

RESULTS:

Overall, 297 episodes (109 in group A, 99 in group B, and 89 in group C) were studied. Patients who received inadequate treatment before receiving microbiological information had a longer mean (+/-SD) hospital stay (27.2+/-32.4 vs. 19.4+/-15.8 days; P=.017), a higher mean risk of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (8.3% vs. 1.9%; P=.013), a higher mean overall mortality rate (30.8% vs. 19.4%; P=.025), and a higher mean risk of infection-related mortality (23.3% vs. 13.6%; P=.031). After receipt of microbiological reports, recommendations for changes in therapy were issued for patients in groups B (52.3%) and C (53.1%). For groups A, B, and C, the proportions of days on which adequate treatment was received were 66.3%, 92.1%, and 91.2% (P<.001); the mean numbers of defined daily doses of appropriate antibiotic therapy were 16.4, 22.2, and 20.7 (P=.003); the mean durations of hospital stay were 19.8, 23.6, and 24.1 days (P=.761); and the mortality rates during the late period were 12.9%, 15.6%, and 11% (P=.670), respectively. The mean costs of antimicrobials per episode in groups A, B, and C were 580.63, 537.98, and 434.53 (US707.85 dollars, US699.73 dollars, and US529.73 dollars, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS:

Written- or oral-alert reports with clinical advice should complement traditional microbiological reports for patients with BSIs.

PMID:
15486840
DOI:
10.1086/424520
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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