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Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2004 Oct;58(5):579-81.

Novel missense polymorphism in the regulator of G-protein signaling 10 gene: analysis of association with schizophrenia.

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1
Division of Psychiatry and Neurology, Department of Environmental Health and Safety, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan.

Abstract

Dysfunction of neuronal signal transduction via G-protein has previously been speculated to be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) is a protein that acts as a GTPase-activator for Galpha protein. A total of 33 Japanese patients with schizophrenia were screened for mutations in the coding region of the RGS10 gene, and a novel missense polymorphism (Val38Met) in the RGS domain was detected. A case-control study did not reveal a significant association between this polymorphism and schizophrenia. The results do not provide evidence that the RGS10 gene is involved in biological vulnerability to schizophrenia.

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