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Cell. 1992 Mar 20;68(6):1077-90.

Unipolar cell divisions in the yeast S. cerevisiae lead to filamentous growth: regulation by starvation and RAS.

Author information

1
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge 02142.

Abstract

Diploid S. cerevisiae strains undergo a dimorphic transition that involves changes in cell shape and the pattern of cell division and results in invasive filamentous growth in response to starvation for nitrogen. Cells become long and thin and form pseudohyphae that grow away from the colony and invade the agar medium. Pseudohyphal growth allows yeast cells to forage for nutrients. Pseudohyphal growth requires the polar budding pattern of a/alpha diploid cells; haploid axially budding cells of identical genotype cannot undergo this dimorphic transition. Constitutive activation of RAS2 or mutation of SHR3, a gene required for amino acid uptake, enhance the pseudohyphal phenotype; a dominant mutation in RSR1/BUD1 that causes random budding suppresses pseudohyphal growth.

PMID:
1547504
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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