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Vaccine. 2004 Oct 22;22(31-32):4365-73.

Immunisation against plague by transcutaneous and intradermal application of subunit antigens.

Author information

1
Biomedical Sciences, Dstl, Porton Down, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP4 0JQ, UK. jeeyles@dstl.gov.uk

Abstract

We have investigated immunological responses in BALB/c mice following transcutaneous (TC) delivery of fraction 1 (F1) and V subunits from Yersinia pestis in conjunction with an enterotoxin-derived adjuvant (cholera toxin, CT). It was found that two or more TC applications of F1 and V subunits (admixed with cholera toxin) served to elicit significant levels of anti-F1 and V antibodies in the serum of immunised mice. IL-6 secretion from cultured splenocytes derived from immunised mice indicated that a single TC application of F1 and V subunits (admixed with cholera toxin) conferred a cell-mediated response. As compared with intranasal or direct intradermal injection of F1 and V, the numbers of F1/V-specific antibody-forming cells in the spleens of animals immunised by TC application of F1 and V (admixed with CT) was relatively low. It was noted that TC application of F1 and V admixed with CT was very effective for priming responses that were boosted by intranasal or intradermal routes. Similarly, it was found that TC application of F1 and V admixed with CT could be used to efficiently boost pre-existing responses engendered by intradermal injection or intranasal instillation of F1 and V. In order to assess if TC application of F1 and V admixed with CT could protect experimental animals from plague, immunised mice were injected with a virulent strain of Y. pestis. It was found that two TC applications of F1 and V admixed with CT conferred only limited protection against 10(2) MLDs. However, three TC applications of F1 and V admixed with CT conferred solid protection against 10(2) MLDs. Hence we have shown, for the first time, that TC application of F1 and V admixed with CT can protect animals against challenge with a virulent strain of plague causing bacteria. These data suggest that transcutaneous immunisation may be a simple and non-invasive method for immunising individuals against plague.

PMID:
15474730
DOI:
10.1016/j.vaccine.2004.02.049
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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