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Vaccine. 2004 Oct 22;22(31-32):4332-41.

Immunization with C5a peptidase from either group A or B streptococci enhances clearance of group A streptococci from intranasally infected mice.

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  • 1Department of Microbiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. cleary@lenti.med.umn.edu

Abstract

Group A streptococci (S. pyogenes) are responsible for pharyngitis, impetigo and several more serious diseases. Emergence of toxic shock, and necrotizing fasciitis, associated with this pathogen over the past 10 years, has generated interest in development of a vaccine, which would prevent infections and potential serious complications. The highly conserved C5a peptidase that is expressed on the surface of group A streptococcus and other streptococcal species, associated with human infections, is a prime vaccine candidate. Here, we report construction of an inactive form of the peptidase and test its potential to induce protection in mice from intranasal challenge with either serotype M1 and M49 strains of streptococci. Mice were immunized by subcutaneous administration of recombinant proteins, mixed with Alum and monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) adjuvants. Control mice were vaccinated with tetanus toxoid in the same adjuvants. Preparations of SCPA protein were highly immunogenic in mice. Antibody directed against protein from either group A (SCPAw) or group B (SCPBw) streptococci neutralized activity associated with both enzymes. Streptococci were cleared from the oral-nasal mucosa of mice immunized with vaccine protein more rapidly than those immunized with tetanus toxoid. Moreover, immunization with either protein enhanced clearance of group A streptococci from the lung. These results suggest that parenteral vaccination with SCPBw protein will provide protection against infection by either group A or B streptococci.

PMID:
15474726
DOI:
10.1016/j.vaccine.2004.04.030
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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