Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Parasitology. 2004 Sep;129(Pt 3):255-62.

Risk factors for gametocyte carriage in uncomplicated falciparum malaria in children.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics and Institute for Medical Research and Training, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria. malaria.iba@alpha.linkserve.com

Abstract

The risk factors associated with gametocytaemia at presentation and after treatment with different antimalarial drug regimens were evaluated in 767 children enrolled prospectively in 5 antimalarial drug trials between July 1996 and December 2002 in a hyperendemic area of southwestern Nigeria. The children were assigned to one of 6 treatment groups: chloroquine (CQ) only; pyrimethamine-sulfadoxine (PS) only; amodiaquine (AQ) only; CQ combined with chlorpheniramine (CQCP); or PS combined with CQ (CQPS) or AQ (AQPS). At enrolment, 115 (15%) of 767 children were gametocyte carriers. During follow-up, 15.6% of all patients (i.e. 120 patients) developed patent gametocytaemia, which in 85% (102 patients) had developed by day 7 following treatment. In a multiple regression model, 4 factors were found to be independent risk factors for the presence of gametocytaemia at enrolment: male gender (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.55, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.36-0.83, P=0.005), absence of fever (AOR = 1.61, 95% CI 1.05-2.5, P=0.03), duration of illness >3 days (AOR=1.57, 95% CI 1.0-2.4, P=0.047), and asexual parasite densities less than 5000/microl (AOR=0.42, 95% CI 0.24-0.73, P=0.002). The presence of patent gametocytaemia at enrolment (AOR=0.04, 95% CI 0.02-0.07, P<0.001) and recrudescence of asexual parasites within 14 days were associated with the presence of gametocytaemia 7 or 14 days after enrolment (AOR=0.5, 95% CI 0.3-0.8, P=0.007). Delay in the time taken to clear the initial parasitaemia (>2 days) was associated with increased risk of subsequent gametocyte carriage. These findings may have implications for malaria control efforts in sub-Saharan Africa where control of the disease depends almost entirely on chemotherapy.

PMID:
15471001
DOI:
10.1017/s0031182004005669
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center