Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2004 Oct;131(4):519-24.

A simplified technique for airway correction at the nasal valve area.

Author information

1
Rush Presbyterian, Saint Luke's Medical Center, Department of Otolaryngology and Bronchoesophagology and Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center, Chicago 60612-3833, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe a simplified system to correct an obstructed nasal airway utilizing the Mitek bone anchor suspension technique (BAST).

STUDY DESIGN:

This is a retrospective/prospective study of patients with nasal airway obstruction treated with the BAST. The retrospective study is based on 188 patients who underwent the BAST over the past 5 years and were analyzed to assess complications and subjective results. The prospective group consisted of 52 patients with unilateral or bilateral valve obstruction who were assessed with preoperative and postoperative rhinomanometry and quality of life (QOL) questionnaires.

METHODS:

The surgical technique is based on introducing a bone anchor into the orbital rim through a 4-mm stab incision. The bone anchor system comes with attached sutures that are easily passed to the valve area and secured in position to support and open the valve area. Preoperative and postoperative QOL surveys and rhinometric studies were compared in 52 patients to assess the subjective and objective outcomes of the procedure.

RESULTS:

Based on subjective data, over 90% of the patients had significant improvement in their nasal airway. Objectively, cross-sectional areas at the nasal valve were found to have significantly improved postoperatively (P < 0.046). Complications were rare and limited to localized infection, reaction to sutures, and loss of support.

CONCLUSION:

Correction of nasal valve obstruction with this technique provides a simplified alternative in selected patients to improve airflow and decrease nasal resistance. The BAST allows for a simple, highly effective correction of an obstructed airway with minimal complications.

PMID:
15467629
DOI:
10.1016/j.otohns.2004.03.035
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center