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Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2004 Nov;19(11):2870-3. Epub 2004 Oct 5.

Pamidronate used to attenuate post-renal transplant bone loss is not associated with renal dysfunction.

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1
Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10467, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Pamidronate is a second-generation bisphosphonate that has been used to attenuate post-renal transplant bone loss, but its effect on the function of the renal allograft is unclear. Therefore, we evaluated the long-term renal function in 57 subjects who had participated in a prospective, randomized clinical trial using pamidronate to attenuate bone loss in the renal transplant recipient.

METHODS:

Thirty subjects (PAM) received intravenous pamidronate, 60 mg at baseline post-transplant and 30 mg in months 1, 2, 3 and 6 post-transplant, while 27 subjects (CON) did not receive pamidronate. We followed renal function, need for renal replacement therapy following transplant rejection, and mortality for 3 years following the start of the original study.

RESULTS:

PAM did not have increased incidence of renal dysfunction or mortality compared with CON at any time point during the 3 years of follow-up. The incidence of proteinuria was also not different between the two groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

The prophylactic use of pamidronate in the above doses to attenuate bone loss in renal transplant recipients is not associated with higher incidence of renal dysfunction or mortality in a 3 year follow-up study. These findings may support the use of bisphosphonates in the treatment of early renal transplant-related bone loss.

PMID:
15466880
DOI:
10.1093/ndt/gfh504
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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