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Ophthalmology. 2004 Oct;111(10):1899-904.

Monitoring cystoid macular edema by optical coherence tomography in patients with retinitis pigmentosa.

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1
Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60612, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To determine the value of optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging in the diagnosis and monitoring of cystoid macular edema (CME) in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP).

DESIGN:

Prospective, noncomparative, small case series.

PARTICIPANTS:

Three patients with RP and cystic-appearing spaces in the macula on OCT images.

INTERVENTION:

All 3 patients were treated with a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, and 1 also received topical and systemic steroids.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Changes in OCT images, fluorescein angiography, and best-corrected visual acuity (VA).

RESULTS:

Although foveal cysticlike spaces were evident on OCT images in all 3 patients, only 1 patient showed CME on fluorescein angiography at baseline. Two of the 3 patients showed funduscopic evidence of macular cystic lesions, whereas a third showed no clinically evident fundus changes in the macula. Optical coherence tomography images documented improvement in the cystic-appearing spaces after treatment with the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor. Changes on fluorescein angiography were either not apparent or considerably less apparent. An improvement of > or =1 line on a Snellen acuity chart was recorded in 2 patients, whereas a third showed no change of VA in either eye.

CONCLUSIONS:

Optical coherence tomography is a potential method for the diagnosis and monitoring of CME in patients with RP. It was more sensitive in this regard than either fluorescein angiography or funduscopic examination.

PMID:
15465554
DOI:
10.1016/j.ophtha.2004.04.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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