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BMJ. 2004 Oct 2;329(7469):770-3.

The hidden curriculum in undergraduate medical education: qualitative study of medical students' perceptions of teaching.

Author information

1
Academic Rheumatology, Guy's, King's and St Thomas' School of Medicine, King's College London, London SE5 9RJ. heidi.k.lempp@kcl.ac.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To study medical students' views about the quality of the teaching they receive during their undergraduate training, especially in terms of the hidden curriculum.

DESIGN:

Semistructured interviews with individual students.

SETTING:

One medical school in the United Kingdom.

PARTICIPANTS:

36 undergraduate medical students, across all stages of their training, selected by random and quota sampling, stratified by sex and ethnicity, with the whole medical school population as a sampling frame.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Medical students' experiences and perceptions of the quality of teaching received during their undergraduate training.

RESULTS:

Students reported many examples of positive role models and effective, approachable teachers, with valued characteristics perceived according to traditional gendered stereotypes. They also described a hierarchical and competitive atmosphere in the medical school, in which haphazard instruction and teaching by humiliation occur, especially during the clinical training years.

CONCLUSIONS:

Following on from the recent reforms of the manifest curriculum, the hidden curriculum now needs attention to produce the necessary fundamental changes in the culture of undergraduate medical education.

PMID:
15459051
PMCID:
PMC520997
DOI:
10.1136/bmj.329.7469.770
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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