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Kidney Int. 2004 Oct;66(4):1387-92.

Urinary excretion of aquaporin-2 water channel exaggerated dependent upon vasopressin in congestive heart failure.

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1
Department of Medicine, Jichi Medical School, Omiya Medical Center, Saitama, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Impaired water excretion occurs in patients with congestive heart failure. The present study was undertaken to determine whether urinary excretion of aquaporin-2 (AQP-2) water channel is exaggerated in patients with congestive heart failure dependent upon arginine vasopressin (AVP).

METHODS:

Sixty-five patients with congestive heart failure and eight age- and gender-matched control subjects were examined. The patients were divided into four groups according to the criteria of New York Heart Association (NYHA). Plasma AVP levels, urinary excretion of AQP-2, and cardiac index were determined.

RESULTS:

Plasma AVP levels were progressively increased following the severity of NYHA class in the patients with congestive heart failure. Cardiac index was inversely decreased, and there was a negative correlation between plasma AVP levels and cardiac index (r=-0.430, P < 0.02). Urinary excretion of AQP-2 was 187.3 +/- 50.2 fmol/mg creatinine in the control subjects. It was markedly increased in the patients. Urinary excretion of AQP-2 was elevated to 1144.4 +/- 257.5 and 990.5 +/- 176.0 fmol/mg creatinine in the patients with NYHA class III and class IV, respectively, values significantly greater than the control subjects (P < 0.05). Urinary excretion of AQP-2 had a positive correlation with plasma AVP levels (r= 0.280, P < 0.02).

CONCLUSION:

The present study indicates that exaggerated urinary excretion of AQP-2 is dependent on baroreceptor-mediated release of AVP in patients with congestive heart failure.

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