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Genetics. 2004 Sep;168(1):547-51.

Importance of the Sir3 N terminus and its acetylation for yeast transcriptional silencing.

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1
Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Stony Brook University, New York 11794-5215, USA.

Abstract

The N-terminal alanine residues of the silencing protein Sir3 and of Orc1 are acetylated by the NatA Nalpha-acetyltransferase. Mutations demonstrate that the N terminus of Sir3 is important for its function. Sir3 and, perhaps, also Orc1 are the NatA substrates whose lack of acetylation in ard1 and nat1 mutants explains the silencing defect of those mutants.

PMID:
15454564
PMCID:
PMC1448112
DOI:
10.1534/genetics.104.028803
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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