Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sleep. 2004 Aug 1;27(5):959-65.

Mandibular dimensions in children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

Author information

1
Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-4399, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We hypothesized that mandibular size may play a role in the etiology of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in children, since a smaller mandible may reduce airway size. We used magnetic resonance imaging to determine the mandible dimensions of children with OSAS.

DESIGN:

Case control study.

SETTING:

Tertiary-care pediatric hospital.

PARTICIPANTS:

Twenty-four subjects (mean age 4.9 +/- 1.7 years) with mild to moderate OSAS (Apnea Index 3.5 +/- 5.1), and 24 matched controls (mean age 4.9 +/- 1.8 years).

INTERVENTION:

Magnetic resonance imaging of the upper airway under sedation.

MEASUREMENTS:

Eight measurements were obtained from a 3-dimensional segmentation of the mandible using 3DVIEWNIX software. Measurements included length, height, width, midsymphysis menti angle, angle of mandible, enclosure area, surface area, and volume. Descriptive comparisons using Student t test and multivariate analyses of variance were performed.

RESULTS:

Individual measurement comparisons revealed no significant differences between groups. Multivariate analysis showed a lower bound of a 95% confidence interval for an effect size measure for "general mandibular size," including all 6 linear, the area, and the volume measurements, to be -0.25.

CONCLUSION:

Our study shows that a smaller mandible is not a feature in children with OSAS who do not have apparent craniofacial abnormalities.

PMID:
15453555
DOI:
10.1093/sleep/27.5.959
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center