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Intensive Care Med. 2004 Dec;30(12):2222-9. Epub 2004 Sep 28.

Preferred plasma volume expanders for critically ill patients: results of an international survey.

Author information

1
Medical and Infectious Diseases Intensive Care Unit, Bichat-Claude Bernard Teaching Hospital, 75018 Paris, France. frederique.schortgen@bch.ap-hop-paris.fr

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Criteria for plasma volume expander selection in critically ill patients remain controversial. This study evaluated preferences of intensivists regarding plasma volume expanders.

DESIGN:

International survey using a 75-item questionnaire.

PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING:

All members of the European and French Societies of Intensive Care Medicine (n=2,415 in 1,610 adult ICUs in Europe and elsewhere) were invited to participate, and 577 (24%) working in 515 ICUs (32%) returned completed questionnaires.

RESULTS:

Among respondents, 17% used crystalloids alone as their first-choice strategy, 18% colloids alone, and 65% both. Colloids alone were often chosen in patients with cirrhosis (42%), coagulation disorders (42%), or adult respiratory distress syndrome (39%); and crystalloids in patients with dehydration (85%), drug overdose (59%), or acute renal failure (49%). First-line plasma expanders were as follows: isotonic crystalloids (81%), starches (55%), gelatins (35%), albumin (7%), plasma (6%), dextrans (4%), and hypertonic crystalloids (2%). Colloids alone were used more frequently in the United Kingdom (40%), starches in Germany (81%) and The Netherlands (66%), and gelatins in the United Kingdom (68%). The main factors behind preferences for first-line plasma volume expanders were time to volume loss correction, duration of effect, adverse events, and cost.

CONCLUSIONS:

Colloids are widely used as first-line treatment, usually in combination with crystalloids. Starches are the most widely used colloids in Europe, where albumin use is declining. However, strategies vary widely across clinical situations and countries.

PMID:
15452693
DOI:
10.1007/s00134-004-2415-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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