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Brain Res. 2004 Oct 22;1024(1-2):44-58.

Anxiolytic effects of kindling role of anatomical location of the kindling electrode in response to kindling of the right basolateral amygdala.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Memorial University, St. John's, NFLD., Canada A1B 3X9. rademec@mun.ca

Abstract

Study of effects of kindling on affect has been complicated by the fact that anxiogenic, anxiolytic or no effects may be observed following kindling of the amygdala. Factors affecting behavioral outcome include strain of rat, hemisphere kindled, amygdala nucleus kindled and location of the kindling electrodes within particular AP planes of a given nucleus. Previous work has suggested that kindling of the right basolateral amygdala (BLA) is predominantly anxiogenic. This conclusion was based on kindling of anterior or posterior parts of the BLA. The present study sought to clarify this conclusion by examining behavioral effects of right BLA kindling in a mid-range of AP planes not yet studied. A variety of measures of rodent anxiety-like behavior were examined, including behavior in the hole board, elevated plus maze, light/dark box, social interaction test and unconditioned acoustic startle. Anhedonic effects of kindling were assessed by a sucrose preference test with controls for fluid consumption and taste sensitivities. All effects were assessed shortly after kindling (1-2 days) and at a longer time interval (7-8 days). Kindling to four stage 5 seizures in the mid-right BLA altered behavior at all time points after kindling in all tests except the hole board and light/dark box tests. The effect of kindling was anxiolytic like in the plus maze, social interaction and startle tests. Kindling in mid-BLA also increased sucrose consumption. Effects on sucrose consumption are consistent with previous studies showing no depressive-like effects of amygdala kindling in rodents. It is hypothesized that the focal nature of the behavioral consequences of amygdala kindling are best understood in the context of the circuitry in which the cells stimulated are imbedded and the impact of kindling on functioning of those circuits.

PMID:
15451366
DOI:
10.1016/j.brainres.2004.06.074
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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