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J Aging Health. 2004 Nov;16(5):615-40.

Alcohol, gender, and cognitive performance: a longitudinal study comparing older Japanese and non-Hispanic white Americans.

Author information

1
University of Washington, Psychosocial and Community Health, Box 357263, Seattle, WA 98195-7263, USA. gbond@u.washington.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Recent data demonstrate that moderate consumption of alcohol may be beneficial to cognition.

DESIGN:

Longitudinal growth curve analyses controlling for variables related to cognition were used to examine the relationship between alcohol consumption, ethnic differences, gender, and cognition over a 4-year-follow-up period.

SAMPLE:

The sample included 1,836 Japanese American and 2,581 Non-Hispanic White American community-dwelling adults age 65 and older who were cognitively intact at baseline and participated in at least one follow-up examination.

MEASUREMENT:

Cognitive performance was measured using the Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument (CASI) and reaction time.

RESULTS:

Current drinkers scored significantly higher on CASI over time than past drinkers or abstainers. The same association between alcohol and CASI was observed in both genders and both ethnic groups.

CONCLUSION:

This study provides support regarding the potential beneficial outcomes associated with alcohol consumption and cognition and that these benefits were not modified by gender or ethnicity.

PMID:
15448275
DOI:
10.1177/0898264304268587
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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