Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Oct;80(4):903-10.

Iron and zinc supplementation promote motor development and exploratory behavior among Bangladeshi infants.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, USA. black@peds.umaryland.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Iron and zinc deficiency are prevalent during infancy in low-income countries.

OBJECTIVES:

The objectives were to examine whether a weekly supplement of iron, zinc, iron+zinc, or a micronutrient mix (MM) of 16 vitamins and minerals would alter infant development and behavior.

DESIGN:

The participants were 221 infants from rural Bangladesh at risk of micronutrient deficiencies. Development and behavior were evaluated at 6 and 12 mo of age by using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development II and the Home Observation Measurement of Environment (HOME) scale. In this double-blind trial, the infants were randomly assigned to 1 of 5 treatment conditions: iron (20 mg), zinc (20 mg), iron+zinc, MM (16 vitamins and minerals, including iron and zinc), or riboflavin weekly from 6 to 12 mo. Multivariate analyses were conducted to examine the change in development and behavior for each supplementation group, with control for maternal education, HOME score, months breastfed, anemia, growth at 6 mo, and change in growth from 6 to 12 mo.

RESULTS:

Iron and zinc administered together and with other micronutrients had a beneficial effect on infant motor development. Iron and zinc administered individually and in combination had a beneficial effect on orientation-engagement. Two-thirds of the infants were mildly anemic, no treatment effects on hemoglobin concentration were observed, and hemoglobin was not associated with measures of development or behavior.

CONCLUSION:

The beneficial effects of weekly iron and zinc supplementation on motor development and orientation-engagement suggest that infants benefit from these minerals when administered together.

Comment in

PMID:
15447897
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Support Center