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Anesth Analg. 2004 Oct;99(4):1173-9, table of contents.

Postoperative pain after abdominal hysterectomy: a double-blind comparison between placebo and local anesthetic infused intraperitoneally.

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1
Department of Clinical Medicine, Division of Anesthesiology, University Hospital, Orebro, Sweden. anil.gupta@orebroll.se

Abstract

Abdominal hysterectomy is associated with moderate to severe postoperative pain. We randomly divided 40 patients (ASA status I-II) undergoing elective abdominal hysterectomy into 2 groups: group P received an infusion of normal saline 5 mL/h via a catheter placed intraperitoneally at the end of surgery, and group L received 0.25% levobupivacaine 12.5 mg/h (5 mL/h). Ketobemidone was administered IV via a patient-controlled analgesia pump as a rescue analgesic in all patients. The catheter was removed after 24 h. Incisional pain, deep pain, and pain on coughing were assessed 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 16, and 24 h after surgery by using a visual analog scale. Ketobemidone consumption during 0-72 h was recorded. Time to sit, walk, eat, and drink; home discharge; and plasma concentrations of levobupivacaine were also determined. Pain at the incision site, deep pain, and pain on coughing were all significantly less in group L compared with group P at 1-2 h after surgery. After 4 h, the mean visual analog scale pain scores at rest and during coughing remained <3 cm during most time periods. Total ketobemidone consumption during 4-24 h was significantly less in group L compared with group P (mean, 19 versus 31 mg, respectively). A less frequent incidence of postoperative nausea, but not vomiting, was also found during 4-24 h in group L compared with group P (P < 0.025). Total and free plasma concentrations of levobupivacaine were small. We conclude that levobupivacaine used as an infusion intraperitoneally after elective abdominal hysterectomy has significant opioid-sparing effects.

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