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J Med Food. 2004 Fall;7(3):299-304.

Green tea catechins protect rats from microwave-induced oxidative damage to heart tissue.

Author information

1
Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Catholic University of Daegu, Gyeongbuk, Korea.

Abstract

We investigated the effects of green tea catechin on oxidative damage in microwave-exposed rats. The microwave-exposed rats received one of three diets: catechin-free (MW-0C), 0.25% catechin (MW-0.25C), or 0.5% catechin (MW-0.5C). Rats were sacrificed 6 days after microwave irradiation (2.45 GHz, 15 minutes). Cytochrome P(450) levels in the MW-0C group was increased by 85% compared with normal, but was 11% and 14% lower in the MW-0.25C and MW-0.5C groups than in the MW-0C group. NADPH-cytochrome P(450) reductase activity in the MW-0C group was increased by 29%, compared with the normal group, but was significantly less in the MW-0.25C and MW-0.5C groups. Superoxide dismutase activity in the MW-0C group was decreased by 34%, compared with the normal group, but in the MW-0.25C and MW-0.5C groups was 19% and 25% higher. The activity of glutathione peroxidase in the MW-0C group was decreased by 28% but remained near normal with catechin supplements. Superoxide radical concentrations in the MW-0C group were increased by 35%, compared with the normal group. However, superoxide radicals in the MW-0.25C and MW-0.5C groups were 11% and 12% lower, respectively, compared with the MW-0C group. Microwave irradiation significantly increased levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, carbonyl values, and lipofuscin contents, but green tea catechin partially overcame the effects of the microwave irradiation. In conclusion, the mixed function oxidase system was activated, the formation of superoxide radical, lipid peroxide, oxidized protein, and lipofuscin was increased, and the antioxidative defense system was weakened in heart tissue of microwave-exposed rats, but the oxidative damage was significantly reduced by catechin supplementation.

PMID:
15383222
DOI:
10.1089/jmf.2004.7.299
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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