Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2004 Sep;71(3):341-9.

Large-scale candidate gene study of tuberculosis susceptibility in the Karonga district of northern Malawi.

Author information

1
Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. jodene.fitness@vuw.ac.nz

Abstract

Twenty-seven polymorphisms from 12 genes have been investigated for association with tuberculosis (TB) in up to 514 cases and 913 controls from Karonga district, northern Malawi. Homozygosity for the complement receptor 1 (CR1) Q1022H polymorphism was associated with susceptibility to TB in this population (odds ratio [OR] = 3.12, 95% Confidence interval [CI] = 1.13-8.60, P = 0.028). This association was not observed among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive TB cases, suggesting either chance association or that HIV status may influence genetic associations with TB susceptibility. Heterozygosity for a newly studied CAAA insertion/deletion polymorphism in the 3'-untranslated region of solute carrier family 11, member 1 (SLC11A1, formerly NRAMP1) was associated with protection against TB in both HIV-positive (OR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.49-0.99, P = 0.046) and HIV-negative (OR = 0.65, 95% CI = 0.46-0.92, P = 0.014) TB cases, suggesting that the SLC11A1 protein may have a role in innate TB immune responses that influence susceptibility even in immunocompromised individuals. However, associations of other variants of SCLA11A with TB reported from other populations were not replicated in Malawi. Furthermore, associations with vitamin D receptor, interferon-gamma, and mannose-binding lectin observed elsewhere were not observed in this Karonga study. Genetic susceptibility to TB in Africans appears polygenic. The relevant genes and variants may vary significantly between populations, and may be affected by HIV infection status.

PMID:
15381817
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Ingenta plc
Loading ...
Support Center