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Arch Dermatol. 2004 Sep;140(9):1109-15.

Skin markers of occult spinal dysraphism in children: a review of 54 cases.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Groupe Hospitalier Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris, France.

Erratum in

  • Arch Dermatol. 2005 Apr;141(4):425.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To verify the diagnostic value of lumbosacral midline cutaneous lesions in asymptomatic children to detect occult spinal dysraphism (OSD) and to propose a practical approach for clinical investigations with respect to the type of cutaneous lesions observed.

DESIGN:

Retrospective study of 54 children referred to the Department of Pediatric Dermatology between 1990 and 1999 for congenital midline lumbosacral cutaneous lesions.

SETTING:

The private or institutional practices of participating dermatologists and pediatricians.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Evaluation of the diagnostic value of midline cutaneous lesions for the detec-tion of OSD. Association of skin examination findings with spinal anomalies detected by magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasound.

RESULTS:

Occult spinal dysraphism was detected in 3 of 36 patients with an isolated congenital midline lesion and 11 of 18 patients with a combination of 2 or more different skin lesions.

CONCLUSIONS:

A combination of 2 or more congenital midline skin lesions is the strongest marker of OSD. Careful dermatologic examination is needed to detect suggestive markers and request a spinal magnetic resonance image, which is the most sensitive radiologic approach to detect an OSD.

PMID:
15381552
DOI:
10.1001/archderm.140.9.1109
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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