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Clin J Sport Med. 2004 Sep;14(5):296-9.

Neovascularization and pain in abnormal patellar tendons of active jumping athletes.

Author information

1
Musculoskeletal Research Centre, School of Physiotherapy, La Trobe University, Victoria, Australia. J.Cook@latrobe.edu.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to investigate tendon pain in abnormal patellar tendons with and without neovascularization.

STUDY DESIGN:

Comparative design.

SETTING:

Multidisciplinary tendon study group at a competitive volleyball venue.

PARTICIPANTS:

One hundred eleven volleyball players volunteered to participate in the study.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Subjects' patellar tendons were imaged with ultrasound, with and without Doppler. Tendons that were imaging abnormal were categorized according the presence of tendon neovascularization. Subjects completed 3 pain scales that examined function (Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment score, 100-point maximum), pain with tendon load (decline squat, visual analogue scale, 100-mm maximum), and maximum pain for the previous week (visual analogue scale, 100-mm maximum). A 1-tailed Mann-Whitney U test compared pain scores in abnormal tendons without neovascularization to abnormal tendons with neovascularization.

RESULTS:

Functional scores were lower (Victorian Institute of Sport score, median, 78; P = 0.045) and pain scores under tendon load were greater (decline squat pain, median, 19; P = 0.048) in subjects with abnormal tendons with neovascularization than subjects with abnormal tendons without neovascularization (Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment score, median, 87; decline squat pain, median, 0).

CONCLUSIONS:

This study indicates that the presence of neovascularization in abnormal patellar tendons is associated with greater tendon pain compared with abnormal tendons without neovascularization in active jumping athletes.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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