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Can J Occup Ther. 2004 Jun;71(3):150-60.

Assistive technology and handwriting problems: what do occupational therapists recommend?

Author information

1
School of Occupational Therapy, The University of Western Ontario, 482 Platts Lane, London, ON. freebret@istar.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Handwriting difficulties for students are a common reason for referral to occupational therapy. Little research evidence is available concerning the factors guiding technology recommendations for these children.

PURPOSE:

The objective of this survey research was to describe the technology-related recommendations and factors involved in the decisions made by Canadian occupational therapists for these students.

RESULTS:

More therapists recommended the use of keyboard-based strategies (93%) than dictation-based strategies (72%). Experienced therapists were more likely to prescribe technology tools. Dictation to a scribe (93%) and desktop computers (89%) were the strategies most frequently recommended. Equipment cost and availability of funding, and the availability of support in the school for the student were the most influential factors, respectively, on the keyboard and dictation strategy type prescribed.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:

The results confirmed that occupational therapists prescribe a range of technology solutions. Factors influencing these recommendations differ depending on the nature of the technology, the person, environment or occupation. Knowing the factors guiding occupational therapist technology recommendations will help provide valuable information about the practical implications of the available technologies.

PMID:
15366631
DOI:
10.1177/000841740407100305
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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