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Can J Public Health. 2004 Jul-Aug;95(4):258-63.

What factors are associated with poor developmental attainment in young Canadian children?

Author information

1
Population Health Sciences Program, Research Institute, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, ON M5G 1X8. teresa.to@sickkids.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study was undertaken to determine the association between poor developmental attainment (PDA) and biological, home environment and socio-demographic factors in a population-based sample of Canadian children.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional data from two cycles (1994/95 and 1996/97) of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth were used. Children aged 1-5 years were included. PDA was defined as < or = 15th percentile for motor and social developmental skills (1-3 year olds) or Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (4-5 year olds). Multiple logistic regression was used.

RESULTS:

The proportion of children with PDA varies across Canada, between males and females, and by age. Among 1 year olds in Cycle I, having a low birthweight (OR=3.3; 95% CI: 2.1-5.2), being male (OR=1.6; 95% CI: 1.2-2.2) and having a mother who is an immigrant (OR=1.6; 95% CI: 1.1-2.2) increased the odds of PDA. Similar results were observed in Cycle II. Among children aged 4-5 years in Cycle II, having a mother who is an immigrant (OR=5.3; 95% CI: 4.1-6.9) and a mother with low educational attainment (OR=2.8; 95% CI: 2.1-3.9) increased the odds of PDA. Low income was a significant predictor of PDA across all age groups.

INTERPRETATION:

The strong and consistent associations with living in a low-income household, having a mother with low educational attainment or a mother who is an immigrant highlight the need for targeting developmental assessments and services to this population.

PMID:
15362466
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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