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Brain Res. 2004 Oct 1;1022(1-2):71-80.

Endogenous neurotensin attenuates dopamine-dependent locomotion and stereotypy.

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1
Department of Psychiatry, McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 115 Mill Street, Belmont, MA 02478, USA. echartoff@mclean.harvard.edu

Abstract

The neuropeptide neurotensin (NT) is highly sensitive to changes in dopaminergic signaling in the striatum, and is thought to modulate dopamine-mediated behaviors. To explore the interaction of NT with the dopamine system, we utilized mice with a targeted deletion of dopamine synthesis specifically in dopaminergic neurons. Dopamine levels in dopamine-deficient (DD) mice are less than 1% of control mice, and they require daily administration of the dopamine precursor L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) for survival. DD mice are supersensitive to the effects of dopamine, becoming hyperactive relative to control mice in the presence of L-DOPA. We show that 24 h after L-DOPA treatment, when DD mice are in a "dopamine-depleted" state, Nt mRNA levels in the striatum of DD mice are similar to those in control mice. Administration of L-DOPA or L-DOPA plus the L-amino acid decarboxylase inhibitor, carbidopa, (C/L-DOPA) induced Nt expression in the striatum of DD mice. The dopamine D1 receptor antagonist, SCH23390, blocked C/L-DOPA-induced Nt. To test the hypothesis that this striatal Nt expression modulated dopamine-mediated behavior in DD mice, we administered SR 48692, an antagonist of the high affinity NT receptor, together with L-DOPA or C/L-DOPA. L-DOPA-induced hyperlocomotion and C/L-DOPA-induced stereotypy were potentiated by peripheral administration of SR 48692. Furthermore, intrastriatal microinjections of SR 48692 augmented L-DOPA-induced hyperlocomotion. These results demonstrate a dynamic regulation of striatal Nt expression by dopamine via D1 receptors in DD mice, and point to a physiological role for endogenous striatal NT in counteracting motor behaviors induced by an overactive dopamine system.

PMID:
15353215
DOI:
10.1016/j.brainres.2004.06.061
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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