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Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2004 Sep 29;359(1449):1367-78.

The broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions.

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1
Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, 525 East University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1109, USA. blf@umich.edu

Abstract

The broaden-and-build theory describes the form and function of a subset of positive emotions, including joy, interest, contentment and love. A key proposition is that these positive emotions broaden an individual's momentary thought-action repertoire: joy sparks the urge to play, interest sparks the urge to explore, contentment sparks the urge to savour and integrate, and love sparks a recurring cycle of each of these urges within safe, close relationships. The broadened mindsets arising from these positive emotions are contrasted to the narrowed mindsets sparked by many negative emotions (i.e. specific action tendencies, such as attack or flee). A second key proposition concerns the consequences of these broadened mindsets: by broadening an individual's momentary thought-action repertoire--whether through play, exploration or similar activities--positive emotions promote discovery of novel and creative actions, ideas and social bonds, which in turn build that individual's personal resources; ranging from physical and intellectual resources, to social and psychological resources. Importantly, these resources function as reserves that can be drawn on later to improve the odds of successful coping and survival. This chapter reviews the latest empirical evidence supporting the broaden-and-build theory and draws out implications the theory holds for optimizing health and well-being.

PMID:
15347528
PMCID:
PMC1693418
DOI:
10.1098/rstb.2004.1512
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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