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J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2004 Jul-Aug;33(4):421-7.

Family-centered care: do we practice what we preach?

Author information

1
Maternal-Child Health, Kaiser Foundation Hospital, Santa Clara, CA 95051-5386, USA. mary.petersen@kp.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine nurses' perceptions and practices of identified elements of family-centered care.

DESIGN:

Descriptive.

SETTING:

Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), pediatrics, and pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) in an acute care hospital.

PARTICIPANTS:

Sixty-two licensed nurses, 37 working in the NICU and 25 working in pediatrics or the PICU.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Scores for the Necessary and Current scales of the Family-Centered Care Questionnaire.

RESULTS:

Scores representing current nursing practice of family-centered care were significantly lower than those representing its necessity (p = .000). Nurses with 10 years or fewer of neonatal or pediatric experience scored significantly higher on both the total Necessary Scale (p = .02) and total Current Scale (p = .017) than did those with 11 years or more. Nurses who work in the NICU scored significantly lower on the total Necessary Scale (p = .013) than did nurses who work in pediatrics or PICU.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although nurses agree the identified elements of family-centered care are necessary, they do not consistently apply those elements in their everyday practice. Years of experience and clinical work setting influenced both perceptions and practices of family-centered care.

PMID:
15346667
DOI:
10.1177/0884217504266772
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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