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J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2004 Sep;62(9):1055-8.

Tobacco smoking history and presentation of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

Author information

1
Legacy Hospital System, Portland, OR, USA. briansc@itsa.ucsf.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The association between tobacco smoking and oral squamous cell carcinoma is well established. However, few studies have evaluated the smoking history based on a smoking versus never-smoking history or analyzed the relationship between smoking history and site and stage of presentation. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between smoking versus never-smoking history and the stage and site of presentation of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

The design of this study was a retrospective review of all patients presented at the Legacy Emanuel Hospital Head and Neck Tumor Board in Portland, Oregon, with a biopsy-proven oral squamous cell carcinoma between 1998 and 2000. Data collected included age, gender, smoking history (smoker versus never smoker), pack-years of tobacco, site, and stage (T, N, and group stage) at presentation.

RESULTS:

A total of 67 patients were reviewed; 33% of patients were never smokers and 67% of patients had a history of smoking with an average of 49.4 pack-years. The floor of mouth and gingiva were the most commonly affected sites. There was a statistically significant difference between site of presentation and a history of smoking (P =.0007). The 2 sites that showed a significant association with smoking were posterolateral tongue and floor of mouth.

CONCLUSIONS:

The findings of this study demonstrate that approximately one third of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma will report that they have never smoked. There was a strong association between a history of smoking and carcinoma involving the posterolateral tongue and floor of mouth.

PMID:
15346353
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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