Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Ann Intern Med. 1992 Jul 1;117(1):42-7.

Lipoprotein (a) levels in diabetes mellitus: relationship to metabolic control.

Author information

1
University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the influence of diabetes control on serum lipoprotein (a) concentrations.

SETTING:

Diabetes clinic of a large metropolitan public hospital, with primary- and secondary-care patients.

DESIGN:

A cross-sectional study. Comparisons of lipoprotein (a) concentrations were made between a normal control group, a group of diabetic patients with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) less than 8.0%, and a group of diabetic patients with HbA1c of 8.0% or higher.

PATIENTS:

Ninety-five normal controls and 93 diabetic subjects (49 with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and 44 with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus).

RESULTS:

Sixty diabetic subjects with HbA1c levels of 8.0% or higher had higher (25 mg/dL) median levels of lipoprotein (a) when compared with either 93 normal controls (8.8 mg/dL) or 33 diabetic patients with HbA1c less than 8.0% (7.5 mg/dL) (P = 0.008 and P = 0.012, respectively). A similar pattern of distribution of lipoprotein (a) levels according to degree of metabolic control was seen in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. No difference in the lipoprotein (a) distribution was noted between diabetic men and women. No correlation was observed between lipoprotein (a) levels and total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels.

CONCLUSION:

Lipoprotein (a) levels are elevated in poorly controlled diabetic patients. Increased levels of lipoprotein (a) may be a contributing factor to the high risk for atherosclerosis observed in diabetic patients.

PMID:
1534477
DOI:
10.7326/0003-4819-117-1-42
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center