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Pediatr Dent. 2004 Jul-Aug;26(4):355-8.

Oral ulcerations as a sign of Crohn's disease in a pediatric patient: a case report.

Author information

1
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. fstavrop@dental.ufl.edu

Abstract

Crohn's disease is an inflammatory intestinal disease of unknown etiology. The disease primarily affects whites, with both sexes being affected equally. A genetic predisposition exists. Symptoms frequently present in the second to third decades of life, although they may present in the pediatric and/or geriatric populations. Oral lesions are significant as they are frequently reported to precede intestinal symptoms. Treatment of Crohn's disease is palliative, with a focus on remission. Pediatric and general dentists play a critical role in the early diagnosis of Crohn's disease. Evaluation of a pediatric patient with complaints of oral ulcerations, as well as gastrointestinal symptoms, fatigue, and/or weight loss requires prompt referral to a gastroenterologist for further evaluation for Crohn's disease.

PMID:
15344631
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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