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Childs Nerv Syst. 2005 Feb;21(2):128-32. Epub 2004 Aug 24.

The significance of skull fracture in mild head trauma differs between children and adults.

Author information

1
Department of Critical Care and Emergency, Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío, Avda. Manuel Siurot s/n, 41013, Sevilla, Spain. angeles.munoz.sspa@juntadeandalucia.es

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objective was to determine whether the age of patients with mild head injury and skull fracture influences the level of risk for acute intracranial injuries.

METHOD:

A study was conducted of 156 patients with skull fracture, 60 children (aged <14 years) and 96 adults, detected among 5,097 consecutive patients with mild head injury (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score of 15-14 points) arriving at the Emergency Department of a Level I University Hospital Trauma Center during 1998. Acute intracranial injuries were defined as traumatic brain injuries identified by cranial computed tomography scan, excluding pneumocephalus.

RESULTS:

Compared with the children, this risk of intracranial injury was 13 times greater in the adults aged 14-54 years and 16 times greater in the over-54-year-olds. Besides age over 14 years (p<0.0001), compound skull fracture (p<0.001), and a GCS score of 14 (p<0.001) were factors significantly associated with intracranial injury in the logistic regression analysis.

CONCLUSIONS:

Skull fracture in mild head injury implies a greater risk of intracranial injury in adults than in children.

PMID:
15338178
DOI:
10.1007/s00381-004-1036-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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