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J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2004 Jul-Aug;13(6):713-8.

Prevalence of physician-diagnosed systemic lupus erythematosus in the United States: results from the third national health and nutrition examination survey.

Author information

1
Intramural Research Program, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892-1828, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the prevalence of physician-diagnosed systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in a national population-based sample in the United States.

METHODS:

Data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) were used to estimate the prevalence of self-reported physician-diagnosed SLE. Adult participants (age > or = 17; sample n = 20,050) were asked if they had been diagnosed with SLE by a physician. All medications currently being taken by survey participants were recorded. Two definitions were used to classify participants with SLE: self-reported physician diagnosis and self-reported physician diagnosis and a current prescription for antimalarials, corticosteroids, or other immunosuppressive medications.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of SLE in adults age > or = 17 based on self-reported physician diagnosis was 241 per 100,000 (95% confidence interval [CI] 130-352). The prevalence of SLE in adults age > or = 17 based on self-reported physician diagnosis and current prescription for antimalarials, corticosteroids, or immunosuppressive medications was 53.6 per 100,000 (95% CI 12.2-95.0). Among adult women, the prevalence of treated SLE was 100 per 100,000 (95% CI 19.8-179.3).

CONCLUSIONS:

Projecting a prevalence of 100 per 100,000 to the population of the United States, approximately 108,300 adult women had a self-reported physician diagnosis of SLE and were receiving specific treatment in 2000. This estimate is a reasonable lower boundary, as it does not include undiagnosed persons or those not being treated with antimalarials, corticosteroids, or immunosuppressive medications.

PMID:
15333286
DOI:
10.1089/1540999041783208
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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