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Ann Pharmacother. 2004 Oct;38(10):1603-7. Epub 2004 Aug 24.

Effect of 24-hour intravenous tubing set change on the sterility of repackaged fat emulsion in neonates.

Author information

1
The Children's Hospital, School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy and University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO, USA. reiter.pam@tchden.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Duration of intravenous fat emulsion (IVFE) infusions, precise method of administration (manufactured bottle vs repackaged syringe), and interval for administration set change continue to be debated.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the contamination rate associated with replacing IVFE administration sets every 24 hours in newborn infants receiving fat emulsion repackaged into unit-of-use syringes.

METHODS:

This was a prospective, microbiologic study of 90 administration sets used in 19 neonates. IVFE samples were obtained from administration sets at the end of a 19- to 23-hour infusion and prior to daily tubing set change from infants who received repackaged IVFE. Samples of IVFE (1-3 mL) were aseptically removed at the catheter connection site proximal to the patient, transferred into BACTEC PEDSPlus culture media, and continuously monitored for 5 days to detect gram-positive and gram-negative organisms, as well as yeast.

RESULTS:

Two samples (2.27%) grew coagulase-negative Staphylococcus. Both samples were from the same asymptomatic patient and were obtained on consecutive days. A blood sample obtained through this infant's central catheter grew the same organism and suggested catheter hub colonization as the primary site of microbe origin.

CONCLUSIONS:

Microbial contamination of IVFE infusion sets changed at 24-hour intervals, using unit-of-use syringes in neonates, was low at 2.2%.

PMID:
15328398
DOI:
10.1345/aph.1E141
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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