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Life Sci. 2004 Sep 17;75(18):2181-92.

Gender differences in cardiac function during early remodeling after acute myocardial infarction in mice.

Author information

1
Hypertension and Vascular Research Division, Henry Ford Health System, Henry Ford Hospital, 2799 West Grand Blvd, Detroit, MI 48202, USA.

Abstract

There are conflicting data about gender differences in cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI), including cardiac rupture and mortality. Using a mouse model of MI, we recently found that the cardiac rupture rate during the first week after MI was significantly lower in females than in males, suggesting that females have attenuated structural remodeling. Thus in this study, we attempted to determine whether: a) females have attenuated remodeling and faster healing during the early phase post-MI, and b) females have better cardiac function and outcome during the chronic phase compared to males. MI was induced in 12-week-old male and female C57BL/6J mice. Signs of early remodeling, including cardiac rupture, infarct expansion, inflammatory response, and collagen deposition, were studied during the first 2 weeks post-MI. Left ventricular remodeling and function were followed for 12 weeks post-MI. We found that males had a higher rate of cardiac rupture, occurring mainly at 3 to 5 days of MI and associated with a higher infarct expansion index. Neutrophil infiltration at the infarct border was more pronounced in males than females during the first days of MI, which were also characterized by increased MMP activity. However, the number of infiltrating macrophages was significantly higher in females at day 4. During the chronic phase post-MI, males had significantly poorer LV function, more prominent dilatation and significant myocyte hypertrophy compared to females. In conclusion, males have delayed myocardial healing, resulting in cardiac rupture, and the survivors have poorer cardiac function and pronounced maladaptive remodeling, whereas females show a better outcome during the development of HF.

PMID:
15325844
DOI:
10.1016/j.lfs.2004.04.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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