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Psychiatr Genet. 2004 Sep;14(3):177-80.

No association between the Pro197Leu polymorphism in the glutathione peroxidase (GPX1) gene and schizophrenia.

Author information

1
Neurogenetics Section, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Clarke Division, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. takahiro_shinkai@camh.net

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Oxidative stress such as free radical-mediated neuronal dysfunction may be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The human glutathione peroxidase (GPX1) is a selenium-dependent enzyme, which plays an important role in the detoxification of free radicals. We therefore hypothesized that the GPX1 gene, which is located on chromosome 3p21.3, may be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The aim of this study is to examine whether a potentially functional polymorphism, a proline (Pro) to leucine (Leu) substitution at codon 197 (Pro197Leu) of the human GPX1 gene, is associated with susceptibility to schizophrenia.

METHODS:

We genotyped the Pro197Leu polymorphism in a total of 113 nuclear families that had a proband with schizophrenia. Genetic association was tested using the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT), the sib transmission disequilibrium test (STDT), and the family-based association test (FBAT).

RESULTS:

The minor allele (Leu) frequency was calculated to be 0.282. We could not find significant transmission disequilibrium of the alleles for the Pro197Leu polymorphism in the GPX1 gene in association with the presence of schizophrenia in our family sample (TDT, chi2=0.03, degrees of freedom=1, P=0.86; combined TDT-STDT, Z'=-0.052, P=0.47; FBAT, Z=0.000, P=1.000).

CONCLUSION:

The results of this study suggest that the GPX1 polymorphism is unlikely to be associated with susceptibility to schizophrenia.

PMID:
15318035
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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