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Clin Chim Acta. 2004 Sep;347(1-2):139-44.

Age-related changes in plasma coenzyme Q10 concentrations and redox state in apparently healthy children and adults.

Author information

1
Divisions of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and University of Cincinnati Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229-3039, USA. michael.miles@cchmc.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) is an endogenous enzyme cofactor, which may provide protective benefits as an antioxidant. Because age-related CoQ changes and deficiency states have been described, there is a need to establish normal ranges in healthy children. The objectives of this study are to determine if age-related differences in reduced CoQ (ubiquinol), oxidized CoQ (ubiquinone), and CoQ redox state exist in childhood, and to establish reference intervals for these analytes in healthy children.

METHODS:

Apparently healthy children (n=68) were selected from individuals with no history of current acute illness, medically diagnosed disease, or current medication treatment. Self-reported healthy adults (n=106) were selected from the ongoing Princeton Follow-up Study in greater Cincinnati. Participants were assessed for lipid profiles, ubiquinol concentration, ubiquinone concentration, total CoQ concentration, and CoQ redox ratio.

RESULTS:

Mean total CoQ and ubiquinol concentrations are similar in younger children (0.2-7.6 years) and adults (29-78 years); however, lipid-adjusted total CoQ concentrations are significantly increased in younger children. Also CoQ redox ratio is significantly increased in younger and older children compared with adults.

CONCLUSIONS:

Elevated CoQ and redox ratios in children may be an indication of oxidative stress effects, which are associated with early development of coronary heart disease.

PMID:
15313151
DOI:
10.1016/j.cccn.2004.04.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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