Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Clin Exp Allergy. 2004 Aug;34(8):1321-8.

Enhanced airway inflammation and decreased subepithelial fibrosis in interleukin 6-deficient mice following chronic exposure to aerosolized antigen.

Author information

1
Respiratory Medicine, Cellular Transplantation Biology, Kanazawa Graduate University School of Medicine, Kanazawa, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Airway inflammation and remodelling are characteristic features of chronic asthma.

OBJECTIVE:

To elucidate the role of interleukin (IL)-6 in airway responses to chronic antigen exposure.

METHODS:

We compared airway inflammation, subepithelial collagen deposition, cytokine mRNA expression, and airway responsiveness between IL-6-deficient and wild-type (WT) mice following sensitization and repeated exposure to ovalbumin (OVA) three times a week for 8 weeks.

RESULTS:

The repeated exposure to OVA induced infiltration of eosinophils, neutrophils, and lymphocytes into the airway, and caused thickening of the basement membrane and subepithelial fibrosis. IL-6-deficient mice exhibited more pronounced infiltration of these cells, a thinner basement membrane, and decreased subepithelial fibrosis, compared with WT mice. The repeated OVA exposure increased expression of IL-4, IL-13, eotaxin, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and transforming growth factor-beta1 mRNA in WT mice. Among these factors, expression of IL-13 and MCP-1 mRNA was further enhanced in IL-6-deficient mice, compared with WT mice. However, both WT and IL-6-deficient mice exhibited similar levels of airway responsiveness to increasing doses of methacholine, even after repeated exposure to OVA.

CONCLUSION:

These results suggest that IL-6 has dual roles in the chronic phase of asthma: down-regulation of inflammatory cell infiltration and enhancement of airway remodelling.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wiley
    Loading ...
    Support Center